How to Get a Great Massage

I’ve had a couple of conversations with friends and colleagues about recent massages that they’ve received. Some of the feedback I heard about their massages with other practitioners was problematic, if not a little alarming.

A few things that I consistently hear about massages that weren’t the best include:

  • the massage therapist talked too much
  • pressure was off – either way too much or too little
  • care was not taken to make sure you were comfortable – from the temperature being off, to the therapist leaving the room or not providing any closure to the session, to draping issues (it’s Oregon law to drape appropriately, by the way)
  • being massaged in places/ways that you weren’t comfortable with.

There’s certainly work that goes in to creating a comprehensive massage session. An artful massage will not only include skillful techniques that are effective and relaxing, but will also combine education about what the therapist is seeing in your body, as well as make sure you are comfortable with what’s happening in the room at all times.

Here’s the Watershed Wellness primer on how to get the massage you need:LowResolution-99

First and foremost, make sure that the therapist understands why you are coming in for a massage.

I’m usually overt about this, asking “what were you hoping I could do for you today?” If your therapist doesn’t ask right out, make sure that you let them know. Maybe you’ve been extra stressed and just need some relaxation time. Maybe you’re training for a marathon and need some muscular tension relief in specific areas. Whatever it is for you on that day, make sure that your therapist knows why you are coming in.

Let your massage therapist know what kind of pressure you like.

Again, a good therapist will address this in the intake, but if they don’t ask please let them know. Also, if during the massage the pressure is off either way, be sure to ask for an adjustment. Don’t feel like you have to grin and bear a painful pressure, and conversely don’t feel like you have to withstand the irritation of pressure that is too light and not quite getting to the problem spots.

If you feel uncomfortable at any time, let your massage therapist know.

If the temperature is too hot or too cold, if you hate the music, or if something is distracting you from completely letting go. Your massage therapist won’t be irritated or give you a hard time about this – they’ll just adjust to suit your needs.

Feeling chatty?

The number one complaint I hear from clients is that their massage therapist was too chatty. It’s awkward to tell your massage therapist that you don’t want them to talk so you can relax. An easy way to deal with this is during the intake. Let your massage therapist know that you prefer a quieter massage, as this helps you relax. Remember: your massage session is not your massage therapist’s social time, it’s time for you to unwind and get great bodywork. Setting the framework from the beginning about your expectations are will go a long way – hopefully resulting in getting the quiet time that you are looking forward to.

Draping is not an option. Period.

MassageTxRoomIn Oregon, we’re legally bound to cover our clients in a way that protects their modesty. To put it frankly, if your breasts or butt crack are showing, that is not ok. If you feel uncomfortable with your glutes being massaged, for instance (and there wasn’t a question about what you would prefer not to have massaged on the intake form) tell your massage therapist. There are ways to address areas like the gluteals and the stomach without compromising your own comfort. And always, if these are places that you’d rather not have your massage therapist work on, let them know!

Massage works best if you can to find a massage therapist that can work with you consistently.

Your massage therapist will get to know your body, your tension patterns, your comfort around pressure, music, temperature etc. You’ll have less of the “getting to know you” part of the session each time you come. Your LMT will be able to start to tailor the sessions to your needs with even more detail after a few sessions.

Your massage therapist will want to know if you had any adverse reactions to the massage.

One friend I spoke to had recently had a massage that caused her neck to spasm shortly afterwards. She felt that the massage therapist had not taken enough care when massaging in this area and had gone too deeply. Even though your massage therapist may have touched hundreds, if not thousands, of bodies, they don’t know your body more than you do. If you are feeling any discomfort during or after the massage, we want to know!

P.S. As a side note, we also like to know if things were awesome. If you feel better, that’s great feedback!

Our massage therapists at Watershed Wellness are all very adept at making sure that you have a great experience and leave feeling better in your body. It is our goal to understand what brings you in for massage, and to meet those needs in a way that is thoughtful and comfortable to you. If you are interested in scheduling with one of our excellent massage therapists, you can check out our online schedule. We hope that you’ll have an excellent experience and let others know. If there are ever ways that we can improve, I sincerely hope that you’ll let US know!

Written by Amanda Barp


Regardless of whether I’m giving a relaxation massage or a more therapeutic focused massage, I emphasize a non-judgmental, safe environment for all of my clients. I enjoy sharing the knowledge of the body that I have learned in my training and hope that you will find your body and the way it works as fascinating as I do.